Is it Common to Pass down Kimonos from Mothers to Daughters?

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Is it Common to Pass down Kimonos from Mothers to Daughters?

According to a survey, 60% of Japanese women pass down their kimonos to their daughters. From grandmother to mother and from mother to daughter, it is not unusual for kimonos to be handed over three generations. Kimonos need to be kept in good condition for 10 to 20 years until the next successor receives it. Japanese people have a special connection to their kimonos.

 

Ga-Rei: Zero, Kimono

(C)2008瀬川ハジメ/[喰霊-零-]製作委員会

The price of kimonos can vary depending on factors such as their quality and the manufacturing process used. Below are a few examples:

Menu Price (low) Price (high)
1 day rental 30,000 yen 100,000 yen
Ready-made product 30,000 yen 100,000 yen
Semi-custom-made product 200,000 yen 500,000 yen
Custom-made product 1,000,000 yen 5,000,000 yen
Cultural asset 10,000,000 yen  

 

 

Ga-Rei: Zero, Kimono

(C)2008瀬川ハジメ/[喰霊-零-]製作委員会

This image from “Ga-Rei: Zero” shows the scene where the head of the Isayama family (right elderly man) passes down his wife’s kimono to their adopted daughter Yomi (left girl). Japanese people would easily be able to see the significance of giving his beloved wife’s kimono to her. She is pleased with receiving not only the kimono itself, but also his feelings. She has taken over the Isayama family’s spirit by accepting this kimono.

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